Traveling the world through cuisine

The Catch of the Day

Fish market

Lately, I’ve received some feedback from some readers who asked in why most of the recipes on this site are “complicated”. I was asked about “simpler” dishes like seasoned chicken or fish.

The reality is that there isn’t much to making simpler dishes as long as you know your seasonings and how to cook the chosen meat correctly. There isn’t much else to it, so today I’m going around the world with four fish recipes that are easy and simple for anyone to make.

We’ll start things off with my Greek roots. Go to any Greek restaurant or Greek-owned snack shop, and a simple Greek-style broiled fish will be on the menu. The ingredients are similar to when you make a marinate for chicken, but since most fish fillets are so light, you don’t really need to soak the meat for hours on end. You just brush it on as a seasoning.

Let’s start our seafood journey on the Greek islands.

Greek-Style Tilapia

Greek-Style Tilapia

Ingredients

  • 4 tbsp of olive oil
  • 1 tbsp of lemon juice
  • 1 tsp of granulated garlic
  • 1 tsp of oregano
  • 2-4 tilapia fillets (sea bass or flounder will work too)
  • 1/2 tsp of dill
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Mix the oil, lemon juice, garlic, and oregano thoroughly in a small bowl. Set aside.
  2. Pre-heat the oven to 400° or turn the broiler on low.
  3. Prepare your broiler pan or cookie sheet with a layer of foil.
  4. Brush each fillet on each side with the mixture of ingredients.
  5. Place fillets on the pan and cook until done.
  6. Top the cooked fillets with the dill.

Quick Notes

Setting the ingredients aside is necessary to allow all flavors to fully integrate. You just need 10 minutes, hence why you should do it first, then heat up the oven.

I generally prefer to broil the fish, but you can also bake it.

Serving Suggestions

Serve the fillets with a nice side of rice (I used rice pilaf in the image), or some steamed vegetables.

Glazed salmon isn’t anything new, but I came across this idea years ago off another recipe. I was first weary of the idea of putting sweet maple syrup on fish, but I’ll admit it’s a wonderful flavor. Don’t imagine your salmon tasting like pancakes, but more like a maple-smokey-Asian-infused kind of dish. I highly recommend you try it.

Maple Salmon

Maple Salmon

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup of maple syrup
  • 2 tbsp of soy sauce
  • 1 tsp of granulated garlic
  • 1 tsp of ginger
  • 2-4 salmon fillets
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  • Mix all ingredients thoroughly.
  • Place the salmon fillets into a baking dish and pour the mixture all over them.
  • Cover the dish and place in the refrigerator for 30 minutes.
  • Pre-heat the oven to 400°
  • Uncover the baking dish and place the whole dish (fish and marinate) into the oven.
  • Bake the salmon until the marinate gelatinizes and the salmon is done.

Quick Notes

I know I mentioned you shouldn’t marinate fish, but salmon and other thick-meat fishes can be. You’re not really doing this to tenderize the meat, but to flavor it.

Serving Suggestions

You can serve this any way you like. Grilled asparagus is ideal with salmon, but rice and/or potatoes or a side salad can work as well.

In Zuzana’s native Slovakia, the typical fish dishes are fried, and I wanted desperately to stay away from that. Christmastime is known for breaded and fried carp, but I wanted to ask “what else?” There isn’t a vast variety of seafood found in the Danube, but salmon and trout are abundant.

Traditionally, Cumin Trout is prepared by seasoning a whole trout, covering it in flour, frying it, or searing and then baking it whole. I more prefer to deal in fillets, so I did a healthier variation. The cumin does make a unique flavor.

Broiled Cumin Trout

Broiled Cumin Trout

Ingredients

  • 2-4 trout fillets (tilapia, sea bass, or flounder will work as well)
  • 4 tbsp of olive oil
  • 1 tsp of cumin
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Mix the olive oil with cumin in a small bowl. Add salt and pepper to your liking.
  2. Pre-heat the oven to 400° or turn the broiler on low.
  3. Prepare your broiler pan or cookie sheet with a layer of foil.
  4. Brush each fillet on each side with the mixture of ingredients.
  5. Place fillets on the pan and cook until done.

Quick Notes

I generally prefer to broil the fish, but you can also bake it.

Serving Suggestions

Slovaks usually serve this dish with fried or roasted potatoes, or with rice.

Finally, I can’t not travel around the culinary world and not go South of the border. Lime and cilantro are wonderful Mexican flavors that go almost anywhere, and light fishes like tilapia or flounder work quite well with them.

Lime and Cilantro Flounder

Lime and Cilantro Flounder

Ingredients

  • 4 tbsp of lime juice
  • 3 tbsp of olive oil
  • 1 tbsp of dried cilantro
  • 1 tsp of granulated garlic
  • 2-4 flounder fillets (tilapia or sea bass will work as well)
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Mix all ingredients thoroughly in a small bowl. Set aside.
  2. Pre-heat the oven to 400° or turn the broiler on low.
  3. Prepare your broiler pan or cookie sheet with a layer of foil.
  4. Brush each fillet on each side with the mixture of ingredients.
  5. Place fillets on the pan and cook until done.

Quick Notes

Setting the ingredients aside is necessary to allow all flavors to fully integrate. You just need 10 minutes, hence why you should do it first, then heat up the oven.

I generally prefer to broil the fish, but you can also bake it.

Serving Suggestions

Some seasoned rice is the ideal side. You can even take some of the leftover mixture from the fish and mix is up with the rice.

These fillets also work nicely in fish tacos.

Tags: Asian, fish, Greek, Mexican, Slovak

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